Transferring your domain, website, and WordPress to us

Yes, it is possible. In fact, it’s even possible to import your Tumblr (among others, see just below) to your new WordPress. Word of caution, importing things will always be like moving house, a dinner plate will get broken, a shoe will get lost; most of all things imported to the new website or new account will be fine, but there will always be something not quite hooked up, but still there. For a nominal fee, we can perform this service for you, see WordPress Transfer & Setup; otherwise, you can follow these steps below yourself.

* WordPress can import:  WordPress, Blogger, Blogroll, LiveJournal, Movable Type, TypePad, and Tumblr (correct as of 27th Dec 2017).

When you move to us, follow these steps:

1. Do a complete backup of your old website. We recommend downloading everything from your public_html folder using an FTP program like Filezila or similar. Especially download your …blog/wp-content/uploads/…

> Click on the image to see larger

An FTP program downloading the folders and files from a website
An FTP program downloading the folders and files from a website
Use an FTP program to download your website contents
Use an FTP program to download your website contents

2. Export your WordPress to an .xml file (or similar); store it in three safe places (1. on your computer; 2. on a USB memory stick kept in a safe place; 3. in the cloud on Tresorit or DropBox)

WordPress Export
WordPress Export

3. Keep the old webhosting account open for as long as possible (at least a month) so you can access any forgotten files.

4. Unlock your domain (it’s a security feature to prevent others from stealing it). Be sure to lock it again when you have it re-established with us.

Transfer Domain from an Old Webhost
Transfer Domain from an Old Webhost

5. Obtain your EPP code (a security code that lets domain registrars and webhosts know that the transfer is authorised, and it prevents domain theft)

Transfering a Domain from Old Webhost EPP Code
Transfering a Domain from Old Webhost EPP Code

6. Open an account with us, and use the Transfer Domain button

Transferring your Domain from your Old Webhost
Transferring your Domain from your Old Webhost
Transferring Domain to Us
Transferring Domain to Us

7. It can take 7 to 14 days for the transfer to complete (we’ve seen it take more than 21 days; strangely it’s a manual process)

8. While waiting, setup a new “Home Page” with Site Publisher, to act as a landing page, or copy and paste your existing .html site into your new public_html folder in your cPanel File Manager (details in your email you received from us). Use this page to link to your subdomains and web apps like your blog, social media, and more.

Create a simple one-page homepage with Site Publisher 1
Create a simple one-page homepage with Site Publisher 1
Create a simple one-page homepage with Site Publisher 2
Create a simple one-page homepage with Site Publisher 2

9. Once the domain transfer is complete, log into your cPanel (yourwebsite.com:2083), go to Softaculous, and install WordPress.

10. Advice, use the same Username and Password for your ‘new’ WordPress installation as before on your old webhost.

11. Important step: import all the photos and uploads from the old WordPress. These go into …/blog/wp-content/uploads/…  You may have a lot of folders here. It’s much, much easier to use an FTP program like Filezila, which can upload the whole “Uploads” folder for you. In one of your emails from us, there is information on your FTP username, password, and address.

12. After putting all the Uploads in place, go to your WordPress Dashboard, go to Tools, go to import, install the WordPress import tool, run WordPress importer, and upload your .xml file from your old site. Everything should work fine (except for one or two unavoidable glitches). You may need to reinstall the theme you used before.

WordPress Importer
WordPress Importer

If there are upload file size problems

You may have a problem with upload file size. First, in cPanel, go to Search and lookup phpini and use the Multi PHP INI Manager to change the maximum upload file size from 2 to 4 or 8mb. Second, and only if editing the phpini file doesn’t work, edit the .htaccess file (as shown in the images below). In cPanel, go to File Manager, go to Settings (top right), turn on Show Hidden Files, and press OK. Go to .htaccess file, and either change the max upload from 2 to 4 or 8mb or add the code “php_value upload_max_filesize 4M” precisely (without the quotation marks; highlight, copy & paste if you’re unsure).

How to edit the .htaccess file
How to edit the .htaccess file
How to edit the .htaccess file 2
How to edit the .htaccess file 2

If you have any problems, please contact us. Alternatively, we can perform the WordPress importing service for you (see WordPress Transfer & Setup). Either send us your .xml file or give us your old account login and WordPress login and we can manage the rest for you (we have our own supply of headache tablets).

Win a free website bundle at the Tokyo ExtensiveReading World Congress this weekend

This offer is only for people at the Extensive Reading World Congress in Tokyo this weekend. Andrew from HelloSpace.Me will be at the exhibitor’s area all weekend. He can help current members with some tech issues, and help you win. There are three ways to win:

  1. If you are the first or tenth person of the day (valid for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday before noon) you win! But first, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, or Google+, share the link Andrew’s interview with John about job interviews and online reputations on your social network, or some other article you really like, and show us you have done it (cannot be deleted). Also, show us the web address you want (see below).
  2. If you are the first or tenth person of the day (valid for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday mornings only) you win! But first, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, or Google+, and share a link to HelloSpace.Me on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, or similar with “I’m going to install ____ on my new website”. Of course, replace “____” with something like WordPress, a blog, Mahara, Moodle, Open Biblio, or whatever your plan is (cannot be deleted). Also, show us the web address you want (see below).
  3. Be a social media influencer. See announcement here.

The prize

You will win The Lite Plan: 2017 with a free domain for one year. Webspace includes 3Gb of storage, up to 5 email addresses, and up to 5 database web apps like WordPress, Mahara, Invoice Ninja, Booked, and more (see the Knowledge Base for the list of web apps available). This is normally over USD$150/yr of value! Currently, the Lite Plan is discounted to $60/yr, but you get it for free for the first year, and then $60 for webspace and normal domain registration charges each year afterwards. Prices are subject to gradual increases. Details about the webspace: https://hellospace.me/host/cart.php.

Web addresses

Be sure to research your web address / domain first, and show us that it is available. You could try “yourname.com” or “yourname.asia” or “yourcodename.us”, whatever you like. See this article for web address ideas, and here to do your research: https://hellospace.me/host/index.php.

New domains added: .photo .fun .tokyo & more

You know, .com isn’t the only Top Level Domain (TLD) address you can have. Imagine your name is John Longbottom, you could have johnlongbottom.com, or johnlongbottom.photo, johnlongbottom.yoga and more. Some are available for only one year, some for up to five years registration. For the full list of what’s available, see the Knowledge Base. What can you do with your own website? Anything. Add a WordPress app, Mahara, LimeSurvey, a photo gallery, your own cloud storage app, anything! See here for details: Knowledge Base. Here’s what’s new:

  • .audio
  • .band
  • .fun
  • .lgbt
  • .life
  • .nagoya
  • .photo
  • .studio
  • .tokyo
  • .xyz
  • .yoga
  • .zone

How to choose a domain name

HelloSpace.Me is designed especially for busy teachers who have other important things to do. We take the pain, difficulty, and the hard work out of setting up a new website. Whilst we have done this for you, there are some things that you need to do yourself. After all, it’s your website, it’s your unique space for you to be you. The first and most important thing is your stamp of authenticity, uniqueness, you: your domain name.

Using WordPress, CC0 Pixabay, https://www.pexels.com/photo/business-coffee-composition-computer-265667/
Using WordPress, CC0 Pixabay, https://www.pexels.com/photo/business-coffee-composition-computer-265667/

Twenty years ago it was easy to get a domain that is simple and straight forward. For instance, if your name was John Smith, in the 1990’s you could get john.com, because no one else had. Early 2000’s, janesmith.com might have still been available. At time of writing, I didn’t even bother checking to see if johnsmith.com or janesmith.com are available; I am certain they’re already taken. So, where does that leave all the other John and Jane Smiths, and you? Well think about it, “janesmith.com” sounds like the most boring place to be on the web. It sounds like it could be a law firm. However, we’re not lawyers, we’re teachers. We can afford to be a little fun, a little unique, a little creative.

There is a creative trend in naming and, err… domaining websites, if I can make up a word. One trend I’ve noticed on the web is to go for compound binomials, which means two nouns with no space between them. Here are some examples, DropBox, FaceBook, MySpace, Netflix, BufferApp, WalkFree, DailyTekk, PureVPN, and others. Another trend is to misspell words, like Flickr, DailyTekk, Tawk, and others. A trend of a few years ago is to use abbreviations, including TNW (The Next Web), IFTTT (If This Then That), and others.

A current trend that I really like is a little more poetic. My favourite example is “Life After Gravity”, which actually is an Instagram account showing photos taken from a drone looking directly down over interesting landscape (see here). I love that account, the photos, and especially the name. Not to mention, the melding of the words Instant and Telegram, which makes “Instagram”. So, what should you do?

Be fun, be creative, be a little “deep and meaningful”, or be boring. Whatever you like. A science teacher could use “ThroughTheMicroscope”, a play on “Alice Through the Looking Glass”, especially apt if your name is Alice, and you’re biology fanatic; or a derivation of it, “AliceTTM”. An art teacher could use “WetOils”, or “PaintingTheMidnightOil”. A PE teacher could use “SmellySneakers”, “Smeakers”, or “MrSmithsRecordBreakers”. Take some time to think of something a little fun, but don’t go for tacky or kitsch, you may regret it later.

The last thing to consider is the Top Level Domain, known as TLD (Wikipedia). There are three types, standard, country code (ccTLD), and generic (gTLD). The standards are harder to get, because these have been around since the 1990’s. These include .com, .net, and .org. Most teachers probably won’t bother with these, as the real estate is basically all bought up. ccTLD’s are perhaps better to try, like .co.uk, .net.au, .co.jp, .com.tw, and so on. These were for the UK, Australia, Japan, and Taiwan. All countries, including the US (.us) has ccTLDs. Also, teachers should consider the generic TLDs like .me (obviously), .asia, .blog, .bike, .guru, .coffee (for the more whimsical), .info, .online, .science, and more. Small schools and tutors could consider .cafe, .education, .meet, .school, and others. Consider an English language teacher in Japan with, “AndrewsEFL.cafe”, sounds relaxing, pleasant, and descriptive; everything I’d want in a language teacher.

Not all TLDs are the same. There is the assumption by domain registrars that TLDs are as important as actual real estate. They are a kind of real estate address, but when some are priced at over USD$13,000 per year, you probably won’t see those go any time soon, unless it is something memorable like lawyer.com, business.tax, or tax.biz. What about johnsmith.asia? That might be available, and the typical price might be about USD$30 per year. How about smeakers.blog? I did check this out, and it’s available and currently priced at about USD$35 per year. Smeakers.com isn’t available, but might have gone for about USD$15 per year. Unusually, the .com’s are cheaper than the gTLDs, despite the land rush is long over, and the space there is getting pretty cramped.

Why did I say that the price is “about”? Most web hosts sell a domain and TLD together in your hosting package. Other webhosts require you to buy your domain elsewhere first, then transfer to them. HelloSpace.Me/host/ has an easy flow of selecting and buying the domain and TLD, getting the hosting account, webspace, and set up in a very tightly designed smooth sequence. We worked hard on making the process as simple as possible for you. Also, hosting companies like us have certain restrictions on prices, and the prices are based on a number of factors that are out of our control. HelloSpace.Me has been very careful with who we have tied our system to, so we are able to offer great deals to our members.

Want to get your own domain, web space, and website within 5 minutes? We’re always ready to help you at HelloSpace.Me/host/.

Are there any restrictions? Yes. .mil is for the US military, .edu is for American universities and other approved educational institutions, .gov is for the US government, and so too .gov.au is for various Australian government departments. Also, .com.au is only available for Australian registered businesses with an ABN. Almost all countries will have some sort of restrictions, and so look these up before you commit to something that might not be appropriate. The most common restriction is on using trademarks and other people’s names for domain names; so you can’t get tomcruise.com (unless you are a Tom Cruise). Often, the word “bank” is not allowed, unless you of course have a legally registered bank of any type (like a blood bank). For language teachers, can they use “wordbank.com”? Possibly, because it doesn’t imply finance, and it’s binomial made into a single word. However, in this case, you really should check with the domain registrar or a suitably qualified lawyer first. I think most people will be fine to go ahead and register a domain without needing to check on any restrictions, especially if it’s your own name, or nicely poetic. If you’re still uncertain, we might be able to help, contact us. Finally, remember you are ultimately responsible for all your actions on the internet.